The fragrant herb you shouldn’t grow next to bee balm

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Mint is known for easily growing in just about any soil or sun conditions. As a part of the mint family, bee balm can quickly overrun the garden, as it is an aggressive spreader itself. This means that bee balm will gobble up resources and reach its roots as far as possible, and its siblings peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) will want to do the same. If too many aggressively spreading plants require more nutrients than one area of a garden can provide in its soil, the plants may all become stunted or choke one another out. Aggressive spreading is not limited to the mint family, but which species are considered aggressive or invasive varies from region to region, so be sure to do some research before planting any other plants near your bee balm. 

You also want to be cautious about planting heavy feeder plants alongside bee balm. Heavy feeders are plants that require significant amounts of key soil nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. To maintain themselves, these types of plants will slurp up all nutrients from the soil, which can stunt other plants such as bee balm. Unfortunately, many vegetable plants are considered heavy feeders. Tomatoes, corn, squash, and other summer heat-loving vegetables all fall in this category and, for that reason, shouldn’t be planted next to bee balm.

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