Julia Louis-Dreyfus calls Jerry Seinfeld’s comments about comedy turning too politically correct due to extreme left ‘a red flag’ warning: ‘It sometimes means something else’

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus is pushing back against Jerry Seinfeld’s recent complaint about how politically correct comedy has gotten in more recent years, compliments of the extreme left.

During an interview with the New York Timesthe actress argued against her former Seinfeld co-star’s belief that ‘the extreme left and PC c**p’ is ruining comedy on television, adding that political correctness can actually be ‘fantastic.’

‘When I hear people starting to complain about political correctness — and I understand why people might push back on it — but to me that’s a red flag, because it sometimes means something else,’ Louis-Dreyfus, 63, told the publication. ‘I believe being aware of certain sensitivities is not a bad thing. I don’t know how else to say it.’   

Louis-Dreyfus knows a thing or two about comedic TV, considering she has won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series seven times: once for The New Adventures Of Old Christine (2006-2010) and six more playing Selina Meyer in Veep (2012-2019).

On top of that, she won the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series for Seinfeld (1989-1998) during her nine-season run on the legendary sitcom that starred Jerry Seinfeld in the lead role. 

Jerry Seinfeld, 70, cited some of the classic sitcoms when making his point about political correctness and its effect of television

Julia Louis-Dreyfus disagrees with Jerry Seinfeld’s comments about comedy turning too politically correct on television, which he blamed on ‘the extreme left and PC crap’ during an interview with The New Yorker in late April

Seinfeld vented about the lack of comedies on television due to people worrying so much about offending other people in an interview with The New Yorker in late April.

‘It used to be, you would go home at the end of the day, most people would go, “Oh, Cheers is on. Oh, M*A*S*H is on. Oh, Mary Tyler Moore is on. All in the Family is on.” You just expected, there’ll be some funny stuff we can watch on TV tonight,’ he told the publication. ‘Well, guess what — where is it? This is the result of the extreme left and P.C. c**p, and people worrying so much about offending other people.’

While the comedian’s position on the touchy subject has now earned him a certain amount of supporters from far-right influencers, according to MSN.com, Louis-Dreyfus disagrees with his position. 

‘My feeling about all of it is that political correctness, insofar as it equates to tolerance, is obviously fantastic,’ the acclaimed actress said. ‘And of course I reserve the right to boo anyone who says anything that offends me, while also respecting their right to free speech, right?’ 

The New York City native admits that certain comedies and dramas from yesteryear just don’t work anymore under modern scrutiny, but being sensitively aware of changing cultural norms should be acknowledged.

When asked directly about Seinfeld’s comments on political correctness, Louis-Dreyfus stressed how comedy has evolved over the decades. 

‘If you look back on comedy and drama both, let’s say 30 years ago, through the lens of today, you might find bits and pieces that don’t age well,’ the TV veteran with more than 40 years of experience said. ‘And I think to have an antenna about sensitivities is not a bad thing.’

The former Saturday Night Live cast member added, It doesn’t mean that all comedy goes out the window as a result.’ 

'When I hear people starting to complain about political correctness — and I understand why people might push back on it — but to me that's a red flag, because it sometimes means something else,' Louis-Dreyfus, 63, told The New York Times. 'I believe being aware of certain sensitivities is not a bad thing. I don't know how else to say it'

‘When I hear people starting to complain about political correctness — and I understand why people might push back on it — but to me that’s a red flag, because it sometimes means something else,’ Louis-Dreyfus, 63, told The New York Times. ‘I believe being aware of certain sensitivities is not a bad thing. I don’t know how else to say it’

'It used to be, you would go home at the end of the day, most people would go, "Oh, Cheers is on. Oh, M*A*S*H is on. Oh, Mary Tyler Moore is on. All in the Family is on." You just expected, there'll be some funny stuff we can watch on TV tonight,' Seinfeld told The New Yorker. 'Well, guess what — where is it? This is the result of the extreme left and P.C. crap, and people worrying so much about offending other people'

‘It used to be, you would go home at the end of the day, most people would go, “Oh, Cheers is on. Oh, M*A*S*H is on. Oh, Mary Tyler Moore is on. All in the Family is on.” You just expected, there’ll be some funny stuff we can watch on TV tonight,’ Seinfeld told The New Yorker. ‘Well, guess what — where is it? This is the result of the extreme left and P.C. crap, and people worrying so much about offending other people’

During his interview with The New Yorker, Seinfeld revealed he didn’t think the Seinfeld cast would have been able to make the same jokes now as he did in the 1980s and 90s due to political correctness.

While Louis-Dreyfus agreed with the premise of the iconic stand-up comedian’s statement, she cited her reasoning to be more centered on the sitcom being ‘too unique’ as opposed to it not being PC enough for the times.

She went on to admit that it’s ‘good to be vigilant’ and keep up with the changing times and culture, citing how even some great films and television shows of the past can include beliefs and attitudes that ‘today would not be acceptable.’

‘Probably not,’ were her exact words when initially asked whether Seinfeld could be made today. ‘I mean, what the hell is happening in network television anymore?’

Louis-Dreyfus won the Primetime Emmy Award six times for her role as Selina Meyer in Veep (2012-2019) and once for The New Adventures Of Old Christine (2006-2010); while also winning once for Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series for Seinfeld (1989-1998)

Louis-Dreyfus won the Primetime Emmy Award six times for her role as Selina Meyer in Veep (2012-2019) and once for The New Adventures Of Old Christine (2006-2010); while also winning once for Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series for Seinfeld (1989-1998)

When it comes to Seinfeld's comment about creativity being held back as a result of the PC culture, Louis-Dreyfus thinks the issue stems from those with the real power and money who pick and choose which shows to greenlight; the duo are pictured in September 2013

When it comes to Seinfeld’s comment about creativity being held back as a result of the PC culture, Louis-Dreyfus thinks the issue stems from those with the real power and money who pick and choose which shows to greenlight; the duo are pictured in September 2013

The hugely popular sitcom, a fictionalized version of himself, focused on Jerry’s personal life with his three best friends: Louis-Dreyfus, Michael Richards and Jason Alexander.

‘When Seinfeld was made, it was really unlike anything that was on at the time,’ she continued. ‘It was just a bunch of losers hanging out. So I would say one main reason it wouldn’t be made now is because it’s hard to get anything different recognized. Particularly nowadays, everyone’s sort of running scared.’   

When it comes to Seinfeld’s comment about creativity being held back as a result of the PC culture, Louis-Dreyfus thinks the issue stems from those with the real power and money who pick and choose which shows to greenlight. 

‘But the bigger problem – and I think the true threat to art and the creation of art – is the consolidation of money and power,’ she said. “All this siloing of studios and outlets and streamers and distributors – I don’t think it’s good for the creative voice,’ the mother of two said. ‘So that’s what I want to say in terms of the threat to art.’

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