Why you may want to deadhead your Knock Out roses in summer

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Unlike pruning, which often involves removing up to half of a plant’s height and should largely happen in late winter or early spring before the roses break dormancy, deadheading refers only to removing spent flowers to encourage more blooms and growth. For some repeat blooming roses, deadheading is essential for keeping the plant blooming all season. While deadheading is an entirely optional step with Knock Out roses, the process is the same as it would be with any other rose bush.

You should deadhead roses whenever a flower has passed its prime during the blooming season, which largely happens in the summer. To deadhead the plant, simply cut off old blooms and the sets of three leaflets that are growing just below them. This should result in cutting just above a set of five leaflets. Ideally, the cut should be made at a 45-degree angle to discourage water and disease from pooling on or in the cut. You can simply discard the old blooms and wait for the new ones to emerge.

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