Is this flowering deutzia actually invasive? We found the basic facts

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The problem with deutzia is that it can grow in a variety of soil types and can handle various growing conditions, such as full sun or part shade. Its self-seeding capability means that it can be difficult to confine this plant just to your yard. Apart from being regarded as an invasive species in North Carolina and throughout the Mid-Atlantic, fuzzy pride-of-Rochester deutzia has also been found growing in state parks in Kentucky. According to the Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States, deutzia is also one of 40 species regarded as being invasive in the Rock Creek National Park in Washington, D.C. 

Once this species of deutzia becomes established in areas such as open woodlands, shaded forests, and even neighboring yards and gardens, it will compete for both moisture and nutrients in the soil with the other plants that are growing in these areas. Plus, its spreading habit means that it can easily crowd out these other garden plants and native species. While you can limit the spread of many invasive plants by deadheading them as soon as flowers have bloomed, or trying other clever ways to keep invasive plants from spreading, this is not always practical for deutzia. So, what’s the solution?

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