Things You Should Never Do With Coffee Grounds Around Your Home And Garden

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As mentioned earlier, coffee grounds can be a great ingredient to your fertilizer. However, whether or not coffee is a perfect fit for your garden depends on the types of plants you’re growing. While coffee grounds can be ideal for species like blueberries and magnolias, there might be other plants in your garden that don’t like coffee as much, like roses and lilacs, which are sensitive to acid soils. Although research has shown that coffee grounds don’t have as much of an impact on soil pH levels as was once thought, it also notes that the pH of decomposing coffee grounds is unstable, so it’s still good to be mindful of your plants’ pH needs before adding coffee to the mix. 

Attempting to fertilize plants that don’t like acidic soil with coffee grounds probably won’t damage your garden, but it also may not boost growth in the way you envision. Prior to using coffee grounds as fertilizer, you should make note of what pH your plants need to thrive. For example, species like lavender and rosemary prefer neutral to alkaline soil, so you may want to reserve any spent java grounds for your more acid-loving specimens. Experts also recommend checking your soil’s pH regularly, with a range of 6 to 7 being the most ideal. To measure the pH of your soil, you can either use a pH meter (you can get one from Amazon for under $7) or pH strips to create DIY soil health tests, or send some soil samples off to a lab for more in-depth test results that will include a nutrient analysis.

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